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Health care in Germany

Germany has Europe's oldest universal health care system, with origins dating back to Otto von Bismarck's Social legislation, which included the Health Insurance Bill of 1883, Accident Insurance Bill of 1884, and Old Age and Disability Insurance Bill of 1889. As mandatory health insurance, these bills originally applied only to low-income workers and certain government employees; their coverage, and that of subsequent legislation gradually expanded to cover virtually the entire population.Currently 85% of the population is covered by a basic health insurance plan provided by statute, which provides a standard level of coverage. The remainder opt for private health insurance, which frequently offers additional benefits. According to the World Health Organization, Germany's health care system was 77% government-funded and 23% privately funded as of 2004.
The government partially reimburses the costs for low-wage workers, whose premiums are capped at a predetermined value. Higher wage workers pay a premium based on their salary. They may also opt for private insurance, which is generally more expensive, but whose price may vary based on the individual's health status.Reimbursement is on a fee-for-service basis, but the number of physicians allowed to accept Statutory Health Insurance in a given locale is regulated by the government and professional societies.
Co payments were introduced in the 1980s in an attempt to prevent over utilization. The average length of hospital stay in Germany has decreased in recent years from 14 days to 9 days, still considerably longer than average stays in the United States (5 to 6 days).Part of the difference is that the chief consideration for hospital reimbursement is the number of hospital days as opposed to procedures or diagnosis. Drug costs have increased substantially, rising nearly 60% from 1991 through 2005. Despite attempts to contain costs, overall health care expenditures rose to 10.7% of GDP in 2005, comparable to other western European nations, but substantially less than that spent in the U.S. (nearly 16% of GDP).

Insurance systems

Germany has a universal multi-payer system with two main types of health insurance. Germans are offered three mandatory health benefits, which are co-financed by employer and employee: health insurance, accident insurance, and long-term care insurance.Accident insurance for working accidents (Arbeitsunfallversicherung) is covered by the employer and basically covers all risks for commuting to work and at the workplace.
Long term care (Pflegeversicherung) is covered half and half by employer and employee and covers cases in which a person is not able to manage his or her daily routine (provision of food, cleaning of apartment, personal hygiene, etc.). It is about 2% of a yearly salaried income or pension, with employers matching the contribution of the employee.There are two separate systems of health insurance: public health insurance (Gesetzliche Krankenversicherung) and private insurance (Private Krankenversicherung). Both systems struggle with the increasing cost of medical treatment and the changing demography. About 87.5% of the persons with health insurance are members of the public system, while 12.5% are covered by private insurance (as of 2006).[8]
[edit]Public insuranceAll salaried employees must have a public health insurance. Only public officers, self-employed people and employees with a large income above ca. 50000 EU (adjusted yearly) may join the private system.
In the public system the premiumis set by the Federal Ministry of Health based on a fixed set of covered services as described in the German Social Law (Sozialgesetzbuch - SGB), which limits those services to "economically viable, sufficient, necessary and meaningful services"[citation needed]
is not dependent on an individual's health condition, but a percentage of salaried income (typically 10-15%, depending on the public health insurance company one is in, where half of that is paid by the employer) includes family members of any family members, or "registered member" ( Familienversicherung - i.e. husband/wife and children are free)
is a "pay as you go" system - there is no saving for an individuals' higher health costs with rising age or existing conditions.With an aging population, there is an intrinsic risk that, in the long run, the burden to be carried by the young and working generations for the higher share of elderly will run the public system into a huge deficit or result in high premiums.

Summary

Country:Germany
Flag:
Capital City:Berlin
Languages:German
Population:80.000.000
Local: Experiences
 
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Experiences:

Experience Categories Healthcare Provider Companies Project Scale Post date Updated datesort icon
Exchange of information between EMR sing telemedicine
Electronic Medical Record
Telemedicine
Medical Centre Leeuwarden Wed, 2010-07-07 17:14 Mon, 2010-10-04 15:18

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eHealth Organisationsort icon Short Description Updated date City Country
Gematik German Gesellschaft für Telematikanwendungen der Gesundheitskarte 26 Sep 2012 - 12:12 10117 Berlin Germany

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